Tag Archives: failed

Jose Mourinho explains why Man United failed to score against Newcastle

Jose Mourinho has noted that Manchester United wouldn’t have been able to score against Newcastle United in ten hours of play after suffering a 1-0 defeat at St James’ Park.

Anthony Martial spurned a one-on-one opportunity to put the visitors ahead in the first half before Alexis Sanchez fluffed his lines after rounding Martin Dubravka.

And Man United were eventually made to pay for their wastefulness as Matt Ritchie stoked home after some terrible defending at a set-piece.

Speaking after the game, Mourinho implied that United had ‘one of those’ days where the ball just wouldn’t go in.

“We could be here 10 hours and we wouldn’t score a goal. That’s the feeling,” he said.

“Anthony in the first and in the second half Alexis with an open goal. Then we have situations. The goal is a mistake. Long distance free kick we lose the first ball in the air because we didn’t compete and then we lost the second ball. Newcastle fight.

“I loved the way Newcastle fought for 90 minutes and I loved the way my players fought for the last 25 minutes to change the result.”

You felt during the game that United, for all their control, were playing at a speed just a few percentage points below what was needed to truly take Newcastle apart. The contrast in attacking zip and precision with the likes of Manchester City, Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur was once again there to see.

Even so, United carved out plenty of chances. Good chances. So perhaps talk of United’s structural approach is being slightly overplayed.

But what once again came back to haunt them, as it so often did last season, was some kind of psychological block in front of goal – especially when they fell behind – and Mourinho doesn’t seem to be any closer to solving that problem.

Arsene Wenger reveals why Arsenal failed to sign Jonny Evans

Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger today opened up on his side’s January chase of West Brom captain Jonny Evans.

Dependable presence

Since making the move to the Hawthorns from Manchester United in 2015, 30-year-old central defender Evans has gone on to establish himself as one of the Premier League’s most consistent stoppers.

The 67-time capped Northern Ireland international has proven himself to be not only a hugely capable defender, but also a stellar leader, with his experience having proven crucial to his side’s stout defensive record over the last couple of seasons (not so much this season, though).

Suitors

Evans’ impressive showings for West Brom last season certainly didn’t go unnoticed on the part of the English top-flight’s biggest sides, with Manchester City and Arsenal having both expressed an interest in the Baggies’ star during the summer.

In the end, though, West Brom stood firm, with Pep Guardiola having admitted that (former Baggies boss) ‘Tony Pulis put a price (on Evans) that we couldn’t afford at that moment.’

Emirates bound?

However, the battle for Evans was very much back underway following the opening of the winter transfer market at the beginning of last month, with Arsenal and City once again having emerged as the leading contenders for his signature.

Gunners’ boss Arsene Wenger admitted early last month that his side would come out ‘second best’ if pitted in a battle of finances with Pep Guardiola’s runaway Premier League table-toppers for Evans, but, in the end, the Citizens opted to splash out a hefty 65 million Euro to bring in Aymeric Laporte from Athletic Bilbao, seemingly leaving Arsenal with a free run at West Brom’s star man.

Financial constraints

In the end, though, the North Londoners failed to secure a deal for Evans, despite confirmation from numerous outlets in England that Arsenal had in fact tabled a last-ditch offer for the Northern Irishman.

Speaking in an interview with BT Sport earlier today, Gunners’ boss Arsene Wenger was questioned on his side’s pursuit of Evans, with the Frenchman revealing that, following the big-money arrival of Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang at the Emirates, the club simply couldn’t afford to pay the sum requested by West Brom for their captain:

‘I said many times that we did what we wanted to do but not all that we wanted to do.’

‘He was not available for what we could afford.’

Alex Iwobi writes to Arsenal fans after the Tottenham defeat

Arsenal and Liverpool fight over Jack Butland

Liverpool star Mohamed Salah reveals why he failed at Chelsea

Chelsea ‘reject’

Liverpool star Mohamed Salah has given his reasoning for why he failed to impress in his first spell in the Premier League with Chelsea.

The player joined the club from Basel billed as the ‘Egyptian Messi’ and there was much expectation surrounding him.

Though, he didn’t exactly set the world alight and that raised some big questions about his Premier League future.

That lead to a move to Fiorentina on loan before joining Italian giants Roma on a permanent transfer from Chelsea.

Then came the summer of 2017, in which he left the club to come back to the Premier League with Liverpool.

He has certainly repaid the faith Jurgen Klopp has shown in him, scoring 21 goals in the English top flight alone.

Now, he’s been speaking about his time at Chelsea and why he failed.

“I didn’t do well because I didn’t play many games,” admitted the 25-year-old.

“I was there for one year, but I only played during the first six months. After that, I hardly participated.

“I went to Fiorentina, scored goals, then in Rome I played very well and returned to England. But it’s not a matter of succeeding or not…”

“Last year I had some good performances for Roma, but I arrived as a forward and started playing out wide.

“This year I’m scoring more goals. In any case, I want to help the team to win titles or be in a good position in the league.”

Liverpool star Mo Salah discusses Real Madrid links

Chelsea isn’t the only club that Mohamed Salah has been speaking about this week.

That is because there have been continued links between the forward and Real Madrid.

Now, the Egyptian has been speaking about those exact links.

Click here to see what he had to say about his Reds future. 

This Student Failed Her Assignment Because Her Professor Said "Australia Isn't A Country"

Just read the emails between these two.

This is Ashley Arnold, a 27-year-old resident of Idaho Falls, Idaho. She’s a stay-at-home mom completing an online sociology degree with Southern New Hampshire University.

This is Ashley Arnold, a 27-year-old resident of Idaho Falls, Idaho. She's a stay-at-home mom completing an online sociology degree with Southern New Hampshire University.

Ashley Arnold

As part of her final class, for which she paid almost $1,000, students were required to complete a project outline last month in which they would compare a social norm in the US and another country.

Instagram: @snhu

For her “norm” Arnold picked social media use, and for her country she chose Australia.

For her "norm" Arnold picked social media use, and for her country she chose Australia.

Narvikk / Getty Images

But when Arnold got her grade back on Feb. 1, she was shocked to see her professor had failed her. Why? Because, according to the teacher, “Australia is a continent; not a country.”

But when Arnold got her grade back on Feb. 1, she was shocked to see her professor had failed her. Why? Because, according to the teacher, "Australia is a continent; not a country."

Narvikk / Getty Images/BuzzFeed News

“At first I thought it was a joke; This can’t be real. Then as I continued to read I realized she was for real,” she told BuzzFeed News.

“At first I thought it was a joke; This can’t be real. Then as I continued to read I realized she was for real," she told BuzzFeed News.

Christopher Chan / Getty Images

The professor, who has a PhD in philosophy, according to her LinkedIn, had given Arnold zero points in multiple sections of the assignment because she believed that Australia wasn’t a real country.

The professor, who has a PhD in philosophy, according to her LinkedIn, had given Arnold zero points in multiple sections of the assignment because she believed that Australia wasn't a real country.

Ashley Arnold

“With her education levels, her expertise, who wouldn’t know Australia is a country?” asked Arnold. “If she’s hesitating or questioning that, why wouldn’t she just google that herself?”

“With her education levels, her expertise, who wouldn’t know Australia is a country?" asked Arnold. "If she’s hesitating or questioning that, why wouldn’t she just google that herself?”

(Arnold asked BuzzFeed News not to name the professor because she didn't want any backlash).

Andrew Watson / Getty Images

I believe I got zero or partial credit because the instructor said, 'Australia is a continent; not a country. However, I believe that Australia is a country. The research starter on the SNHU’s Shapiro library written by John Pearson (2013) states, that Australia is the 'sixth-largest country in the world' (n.p.). The full name of the country is the Commonwealth of Australia, meaning Australia is both a continent and a country. Therefore, these sections of the rubric should be amended.

I will gladly re-examine your week 2 milestone project report.

But before I do I want you to understand that any error in a project can invalidate the entire research project.

Research is like dominoes, if you accidentally knock over one piece the entire set will also fall.

Australia is a continent; it is not a country. That error made it nearly impossible for you to accurately complete your week 2 research outline correctly.

As I mentioned above I will look over your week two paper once again and see if you earned more credits than I gave you.

Australia is both a country and a continent. It’s the only country that is both. I provided a resource in the first email that clarifies that for you. If you need further clarification google or the SNHU Shapiro Library has that information you.

Again I mean no disrespect but my grade is affected by your assumption that Australia is not a country when it in fact is.

Thank you and let me know if I need to provide further resources proving Australia is a country.

Thank you for this web-address

After I do some independent research on the continent/country issue I will review your paper.

Let’s stop for a second and just state for the record that Australia is a country. Here’s the Australian prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull.

Let's stop for a second and just state for the record that Australia is a country. Here's the Australian prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull.

He's even drinking a beer! That's pretty Australian.

Mark Nolan / Getty Images

Here are some members of the Australian women’s soccer team, the Matildas.

Here are some members of the Australian women's soccer team, the Matildas.

Otto Greule Jr / Getty Images

And here’s Australia’s foreign minister, Julie Bishop, speaking at the United Nations, a pretty exclusive international club that you have to be a 100% real country to join.

And here's Australia's foreign minister, Julie Bishop, speaking at the United Nations, a pretty exclusive international club that you have to be a 100% real country to join.

Kena Betancur / AFP / Getty Images

Anyway, Arnold said she was determined to have the professor realize her mistake, so she filed a report with the university. “I’m not going to fail because I chose a country that is a country,” she said.

Anyway, Arnold said she was determined to have the professor realize her mistake, so she filed a report with the university. "I’m not going to fail because I chose a country that is a country," she said.

She said she approached BuzzFeed News with her story because she was worried other students might have been incorrectly graded by the professor.

Ashley Arnold

The professor never apologized for the error, but did acknowledge she had a “misunderstanding about the difference between Australia as a country and a continent.”

Still, the professor had another warning for Arnold as she prepares to write her final assignment: “Please make sure the date, the facts, and the information you provide in your report is about Australia the country and not Australia the continent.”

🤔🤔🤔

Contacted by BuzzFeed News, a spokesperson for Southern New Hampshire University said they were looking into the matter.

“At SNHU, we hold our professors to a high standard of excellence and strive to provide high-quality degree programs for all students,” the spokesperson said. “On this question, the student is right. We take this concern seriously and our academic team is working to resolve the matter.”

Instagram: @snhu

“When did Australia become a country? Maybe she thinks it’s still part of England,” she said.

After being told by BuzzFeed News that happened some 117 years ago, Arnold said, “Oh, she’s not that old, so there’s no excuse.”

Disclaimer: The author of this post is from the very real country that is Australia.

Michigan governor admits his prison food privatization scheme has failed

State prisoners in Michigan would no longer rely on scandal-plagued for-profit vendors to feed them under the budget Gov. Rick Snyder (R) proposed Wednesday.

Snyder’s FY2019 budget plan adds $13.7 million in Corrections funding to move prison food service back into public hands. It is a dramatic reversal for Snyder, who initiated the privatization of the prison food system in late 2013.

Snyder’s move to hand prison kitchens over to profit-seekers placed an inherently public duty — adequately and safely feeding the incarcerated — at odds with the shareholder-service ambitions of the vendors he put Michigan into bed with.

Snyder acknowledged things didn’t work out like he’d hoped on Wednesday.

“We’ve worked with a couple of different private vendors,” Snyder said, according to the Detroit Free Press. “The benefits of continuing on that path don’t outweigh the costs and we should transition back to doing it in-house.”

This is a grave understatement. Michigan’s first prison food contractor was Aramark, a company most Americans only encounter when they get a hot dog at a baseball game or go to a college dining hall for lunch.

Aramark repeatedly failed to provide the minimum caloric nutrition required by the contract Michigan gave it. Underfeeding prisoners should be scandalous enough on its own, but Aramark was also given to more flamboyant transgressions of prisoner rights.

It served maggot-ridden food to inmates. One of its employees knowingly ordered workers to serve meat that had thawed in a broken freezer for days. Another had staff pluck rat-bitten snack cakes out of the trash can, spread frosting over the tooth marks, and serve them.

When the company’s staff weren’t underfeeding people with dangerous and contaminated food, they were breaking prison rules. Some were caught smuggling contraband. Others were caught having sex with people serving prison sentences.

Michigan eventually yanked Aramark’s deal. But Snyder wasn’t yet convinced that such failures are a predictable byproduct of the corner-cutting incentives of privatized public service. His administration explicitly said it was terminating the deal for cost reasons and not due to Aramark’s dangerous and inhumane food provision work.

Almost immediately, he hired a different company called Trinity to smooth out Aramark’s rough places. Trinity didn’t. Prisoners in Michigan were once again expected to accept insufficient and tainted food. Maggots showed up on cafeteria trays again. Aramark had had 186 staffers banned from prison grounds for violating various rules about inmate contact and security protocol. Trinity managed to get 176 staffers banned for similar misconduct.

None of this should have been surprising. Privatization of public duties is a bad gamble in almost every case — whether it’s a toll bridge or a parking meter system or the more viscerally human question of what people doing hard time should be expected to put in their bodies.

Handing the keys of a public problem over to profit-driven penny-pinchers almost always delivers a worse outcome for the public than paying an in-house workforce. Performing public services with public employees also keeps taxpayer money involved inside your local economy rather than shipping large chunks of it off to distant corporate accounts.

Snyder may have been slow on the uptake here, but the proposal to re-invest in professionalism and purpose-driven service is a welcome change for the many organizations that have sought to bring attention to the system’s abuses.

“The abuses and waste that have resulted from these contracts have endangered corrections officers, prison employees, and prisoners. It’s about time Snyder showed some common sense and took our advice,” said Lonnie Scott of Progress Michigan, which helped expose early failures in the Aramark deal.

“It’s time to return this service back to public employees and out of the hands of out-of-state corporations.”