David Beckham Sits Front Row at Victoria's Fashion Week Show with Their Kids: 'Proud of Mummy'

Victoria Beckham‘s show at New York Fashion Week was a family affair.

David Beckham and three of the couple’s kids – Romeo, 15, Cruz, 12, and Harper, 6 – sat in the front row at the James Burden Mansion on Manhattan’s Upper East Side as the fashion mogul presented her Autumn/Winter 2018 show on Sunday morning.

After the models hit the catwalk, Victoria greeted the crowd in a chic all-black ensemble and made sure to give each of her family members a quick kiss.

The entire family put on a stylish display, with the athlete — who recently launched a soccer team in Miami — opting for a classic black suit and tie, and the couple’s two sons wearing long coats. Daughter Harper has clearly inherited her mom’s passion for fashion, wearing a sweet white dress and burgundy coat, and her hair in two French braids.

 

Noticeably missing? The pair’s son Brooklyn, 18, who moved to N.Y.C. to attend college and study photography. Despite his absence, both mom and dad made sure to give him a shout out on their social media pages.

RELATED VIDEO: Victoria Beckham Regrets ‘Messing With’ Breast Implants

“Kisses x #VBAW18 love u @davidbeckham @romeobeckham@cruzbeckham #harper,” the Spice Girl captioned a black and white still featuring her family. “x miss u @brooklynbeckham #NYFW”

David shared a selfie with his three kids on Instagram and wrote, “Show day… Proud of mummy @victoriabeckham@romeobeckham @cruzbeckham#harperseven we miss you @brooklynbeckham”

But Brooklyn is still a big supporter – he most recently joined his dad in September as Victoria debuted her Spring/Summer 2018 line at Fashion Week in the Big Apple.

This year marks the 10-year anniversary of the popular fashion brand, but Victoria is keeping a sense of humor.

“Show break!” she captioned a silly pic showing her legs peek out from the bottom of a bathroom stall where she’s donning white slippers.

Are you loving this fashionable show of family support? Let us know in the comments.

Trump administration drafts new regulations to punish legal immigrants for taking care of their kids

The Trump administration is combining their hatred of immigrants—even the ones here legally—and of poor people in a new draft regulation obtained by Vox’s Dara Lind. The new regulations would keep legal immigrants from extending their stays, achieving permanent residence and presumably citizenship, and settling in the U.S. if they obtain any of a slew of federal, state, or local social services to which they are legally eligible. That includes if they obtain services like Head Start and CHIP for U.S.-born, citizen children.

The rule can’t make it illegal for these immigrants to obtain the services—that would require legislation—but it would give the government the power to deny their applications “for a new type of visa, or a green card, if they’d used those services.” That even includes Obamacare subsidies, which are available to solidly middle-class families—a family of four can make up to $97,200 and still qualify for the insurance subsidy. But that could put them in the category of a “public charge,” someone using government assistance.

Right now, the government can only consider use of cash benefits, like Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, in “public charge” determinations. The Trump administration wants to give officials the power to look at use of other benefits as well, including:

some “educational benefits,” including use of Head Start for children
Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
use of any subsidies, or purchase of subsidized insurance, under the Affordable Care Act
food stamps
Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) assistance
Housing benefits, like Section 8
Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
transit vouchers

Using any of these for more than six months in the last two years (before applying for a different visa or a green card) would be considered a “heavily weighted” strike against the immigrant. (That strike could be canceled out if an immigrant was making more than 250 percent of the federal poverty level when applying for the new visa or green card—which, for a family of 4 in 2017, was $60,750.)

This is—again—punishing people who come here legally, though it isn’t apparently going to be retroactive. However, legal immigrants—other than refugees and asylees—here now who might use any of these programs after the regulations go into effect could lose the opportunity to stay here permanently.

What a welcome to America, huh?

Beyoncé Protégés Chloe x Halle Drop Retro-Tinged Video for Hypnotic New Song 'The Kids Are Alright'

Who run the world? These girls!

Sister act Chloe x Halle have released a sepia-toned music video for their new song “The Kids Are Alright,” and it’s a retro-tinged delight.

The Bailey siblings — Chloe is 19, Halle 17 — star alone in the understated video, in which they sing and play with a vintage camcorder. The simple, no-frills production keeps the focus on the sisters’ perfect harmony and their Gen Z anthem’s empowering lyrics.

“We don’t really care about the trend you like to follow / You know what they say, they here today and gone tomorrow,” Chloe x Halle sing, later adding: “Everything is new ’cause we about that innovation / Call it how we see it we a genius generation.”

In 2013, Chloe x Halle slayed an angelic cover of Beyoncé‘s “Pretty Hurts.” Queen Bey took notice, signed the Baileys to her Parkwood Entertainment label, and their star has only grown brighter in the years since. In 2016, the pair appeared in Bey’s Lemonade visual album, went on to open for her on the European leg of the Formation World Tour and wrapped the year with an appearance on PEOPLE’s prestigious annual Ones to Watch list.

They continue to upload covers to their YouTube channel (check out their take on Cardi B’s “Bodak Yellow”!), and last year Chloe x Halle released their unofficial mixtape The Two of Usperformed at Essence Festival and in New Orleans. And they’ve made a foray into television with recurring roles on the black-ish spin-off grown-ish, appearing alongside Yara Shahidi in the college-set Freeform series; the duo even recorded the sitcom’s theme song, “Grown.”

Now, Chloe x Halle are preparing to release their debut full-length album.

'I miss my wife, the kids, I miss Youngstown': Ohio dad deported to 'land he barely knows'

Family reunions should be joyous occasions. A son seeing his mother for the first time in decades should be a joyous occasion. Reunions should be by choice. But for Amer “Al” Adi Othman, his reunion was bittersweet, at best. The Ohio dad, husband and businessman was the center of a deportation case that earned national attention for Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) senselessness and cruelty. Despite the support of his community and a rare legislative move from Congressman Tim Ryan that should have halted his immediate deportation, Othman was kicked out after decades in the U.S. and no criminal record. ICE officials barely gave him time to say good-bye to his family over the phone:

With nothing but the clothes on his back and less than $300 in his pocket, Amer Adi was put on a plane and deported to Jordan, the country he left 39 years ago to pursue his American dream.

His 94-year-old mother sat in a wheelchair at the arrivals gate, overcome with emotion as she waited for Adi. She hadn’t seen him in 20 years.

As he walked out, his siblings, nephews and nieces broke out in cheers. But they were soon in tears.

Adi fell to his knees, a broken man in his mother’s arms.

“I have mixed feelings, very mixed feelings. I’m so happy, so glad to be here, my home, to see my mother, my brother, my family, my friends, that makes me proud and happy,” Adi told CNN at the airport.

“At the same time, I feel so sad of what happened to me,” he continued. “I’m so sorry to tell you what happened is unjust, not right, and everyone back there knows that. What the Trump administration is doing is—you can’t even explain it.” But the truth is that Trump’s mass deportation force is set on an ethnic cleansing that is picking up as many families as possible without regard to how long they’ve been here, how many U.S. citizen kids they have, and how much of the American dream they’ve achieved their own grit and sweat. Othman, the owner of Downtown Circle Convenience and Deli and Circle Hookah and Bar in Youngstown, was hailed as a “pillar of the community.”

This bill would prohibit South Dakota teachers from acknowledging transgender kids exist

For the second year in a row, South Dakota could be the first state legislature to push through an anti-LGBTQ bill in 2018, and it’s a brand new kind of attack. The proposed bill would censor schools from discussing transgender issues until students are in eighth grade.

S.B. 160 is short. It adds the following to the state education code:

No instruction in gender identity or gender expression may be provided to any student in kindergarten through grade seven in any public school in the state.

The bill’s sponsor, state Sen. Phil Jensen (R), believes the issues aren’t age-appropriate and actually argues that they could get in the way of learning other skills. “I think we need to be focusing on reading, writing and arithmetic,” he said.

The bill is a new spin on a series of “no promo homo” laws that are on the books in seven other states. These laws vary from state to state in the way they either prohibit discussing homosexuality in schools or dictate teaching that homosexuality is harmful or even against the law — even though sodomy laws have been unenforceable since the Supreme Court overturned them in 2003. South Dakota’s bill would be the first to extend such censorship to gender identity issues.

As GLSEN points out, several states have taken steps in the opposite direction, ensuring that schools respect transgender students. For example, when the Massachusetts Department of Education issued guidance in 2013 for protecting trans students, it included the recommendation that schools “incorporate education and training about trans and gender non-conforming into anti-bullying curriculum, students leadership trainings, and staff professional development.” Studies have repeatedly found that schools with an LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum have far lower rates of anti-LGBTQ bullying.

It thus stands to reason that under Jensen’s bill, a transgender student would receive no institutional support. Educating students about the trans student’s identity and why it’s inappropriate to bully them would be prohibited under law. The many books that help explain these issues to young children, like I Am Jazz and My Princess Boy, would be barred from classrooms.

And that’s not Jensen’s only anti-transgender bill this session. He’s also introduced S.B. 202, which would require posting warning signs on public restrooms “that a person of the opposite sex may be in the restroom the user is about to enter.”

Jensen has been called South Dakota’s “most conservative lawmaker.” He previously introduced a bill to allow businesses to discriminate against LGBTQ people, and he defended it by arguing that a Ku Klux Klan-run bakery should be allowed to turn away African-American customers.

South Dakota was the first state to pass an anti-LGBTQ law in 2017, one that ensured religiously affiliated adoption agencies could discriminate against same-sex couples without consequence. Jensen defended that bill by comparing LGBTQ people to pedophiles.

In 2016, South Dakota lawmakers advanced a bill that would have blocked schools from accommodating trans students’ gender identities, but Gov. Dennis Daugaard (R) ultimately vetoed the bill. A similar bill was introduced last year, but didn’t advance. Daugaard has likewise expressed concern with Jensen’s new bill, saying that he doesn’t “know that our standards of education are properly the subject of legislative enactments.”


The Kids That Invaded Their Dad's BBC News Interview Pound On The Door Now When He's On TV

He now locks the door!

The greatest TV moments of 2017 was, without a shadow of a doubt, this interview that turned into a complete shambles when the interviewee’s kids invaded.

Robert E Kelly, a professor of political science, was supposed to be talking about the resignation of South Korea's president Park Geun-hye. However, he forgot to lock the door behind him, resulting in both of his kids crashing his interview.

BBC News / Via youtube.com

It spawned one of the greatest GIFs of all time.

It spawned one of the greatest GIFs of all time.

BBC News

And when it went viral across the world, he responded with this tweet when BBC News asked if they could repeat the clip on television.

And when it went viral across the world, he responded with this tweet when BBC News asked if they could repeat the clip on television.

“Goes viral and gets weird.”

Twitter: @i

Now, whenever he tweets an upcoming interview, everyone has one thing on their mind.

Now, whenever he tweets an upcoming interview, everyone has one thing on their mind.

Twitter: @Robert_E_Kelly

Oh, and your eyes can’t help looking at this corner of the screen, just in case something is about to happen.

Oh, and your eyes can't help looking at this corner of the screen, just in case something is about to happen.

BBC News / Via youtube.com

He said: “This whole thing happened because I was tired, it was the day the South Korean president had been impeached, I had done five interviews beforehand and I just forgot to push the button, man.”

He said: "This whole thing happened because I was tired, it was the day the South Korean president had been impeached, I had done five interviews beforehand and I just forgot to push the button, man."

BBC News

He then said: “Even now, when I push the button, my kids come down the hallway and they pound on the door … If you ever watch me doing a TV video and I’m talking very loud, it’s because I’m covering up my kids pounding on the door, because my wife lost track of them again.”

He then said: "Even now, when I push the button, my kids come down the hallway and they pound on the door ... If you ever watch me doing a TV video and I'm talking very loud, it's because I'm covering up my kids pounding on the door, because my wife lost track of them again."

“And they come running down the hall and they pound on the door [and go] 'DADDY DADDY DADDY.'”

Yeah, that's my family, man. My kids are very energetic.”

BBC News

Thank you for the memories.

Thank you for the memories.

BBC News / Via media.giphy.com